Tag Archives: appearance

nothing is to be feared

We cannot control the actions of others. That is a given. But, we can control our response.

One of my favorite passages in the New Testament is in the First Letter of John where the writer talks about the need for loving each other more. In one verse he writes, “There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear..”

We need to love more, and we need to fear less. As Madam Curie so elegantly states, nothing in life is to be feared. Nothing. So that includes those that don’t look as we do, ┬áthose who speak a different language, those that worship differently than we do, those whose sexual orientation is not like ours, and even┬áthose who might hate us,

Fear is a powerful demonstration that the depth of our discipleship is too shallow. Our lack of love for those we do not understand is a clear signal that we do not love God enough to understand. We have nothing to fear.

the same Christ

In Holy Communion we have Christ under the appearance of bread. In our work we find him under the appearance of flesh and blood. It is the same Christ. — Mother Teresa

This past Saturday’s blog post (entitled a good question) focused on Shane Claiborne’ s question about the dichotomy of worshiping a homeless man on Sunday and ignoring a homeless man on Monday. Shortly after posting that blog I came across this quote from Mother Teresa. Both quotes heavily influenced my Communion message on Sunday morning.

As Christians we believe that when the Communion elements of bread and wine are consecrated they become the body and blood of Christ. We call Communion a Holy Sacrament because we believe it is a divine means of grace. Christ comes to us in the form of bread and wine.

Mother Teresa tells us that as Christ comes to us in the bread and wine on Sunday, He comes to us in the guise of one of the least of these every day during the week.

Every opportunity we have to draw closer to the oppressed, the poor, the hungry, the homeless, those in prison, and those despised by society is then a true means of grace.

And that brings us back to Shane Claiborne’s question: “How can we worship a homeless man on Sunday and ignore him on Monday?”

It really is a good question, isn’t it?