Tag Archives: demonstration

I’m with her

Thank you, Sally Yates for doing the right thing in the right way at the right time. All patriotic citizens of the United States owe you a debt of gratitude.

You took immediate action to uphold the traditional values of the United States. Your action in defiance of #BLOTUS was a true demonstration of faithfully defending equality and freedom. I applaud your strength of character, and commend you for defending the Constitution.

May we all be inspired by this courageous lady who has acted in the best tradition of our nation. And may we all follow her example in standing up against the unbridled bigotry and continuing attacks against our Constitution. United we stand.

a sign for our times

These are definitely words to remember as we go through the next four years. We have to work together to encourage each other and to demonstrate to the rest of the world that not everyone in our country has given up on love, mercy and caring for one another.

do something wonderful

Isn’t this our call as people of faith? We are to live in the love which has first been shown to us. Reflecting that love to others is what life is all about.

If we demonstrate Christ’s love to all those we meet (and the key word here is demonstrate), there are some who won’t understand, but there are others who will not only soak up that love but also share it.  Do something wonderful this week.  Do something that demonstrates the love that we call Emmanuel.

a “Christian lifestyle”

The Apostle Paul provides us with a clear and concise reminder of how we are to live as followers of Jesus Christ. These are traits that reflect God’s love, and they demonstrate a serious attempt to model our lives like our master and teacher.

If these traits are not evident in a person’s lifestyle it might be a sign of a shallow spirituality, or that there is no real depth to their discipleship. We demonstrate our faithfulness by the way we live, not by what we say.

#ZeroHunger

Imagine #zerohunger.

Our generation is the first in history with the possibility of ending hunger forever. Think about what a world changer that will be. Working together we can create a world where every child is fed and not one of our human family goes to bed with an empty stomach.

What a powerful legacy to leave to our children and grandchildren. Creating a world with #zerohunger is both the right thing to do and is a powerful demonstration of our global community living more justly.

#zerohunger…lets make it happen. Let’s eradicate hunger in our lifetime.

do all the good you can

Do all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, in all the places you can, at all the times you can, to all the people you can, as long as ever you can. — John Wesley

This familiar quote by the founder of Methodism never loses its appeal to me. Every time I hear it used or every time I see it quoted again reminds me that we have an unending responsibility “to keep on keeping on.”

What continues to inspire me is that John Wesley didn’t just preach about doing good. He demonstrated the “do all the good you can” philosophy every day of his life. He preached to the poor, visited those in prison, and never ceased crusading for those marginalized by society.

Mr. Wesley would  not be popular in today’s United Methodist Church. He would be disgusted by (what would appear to him as) the laziness demonstrated by the majority of today’s clergy. He would find the amount of time we waste as both abhorrent and inexcusable. He simply wouldn’t tolerate the lack of zeal we demonstrate as leaders of the people called Methodists.

He wouldn’t be gentle in instructing us about doing good at all the times we could. He would be quick to administer a solid kick to the seat of our pants with a loving reminder that we are to do all the good we can for as long as we can.

And I am quite sure Mr. Wesley would let us know in no uncertain terms that there is no retiring from doing all the good we can. Wesley was raising funds for the poor in snow and ice less than two weeks before he died. But then, for him,  doing good wasn’t a career. It was a calling.