Tag Archives: elite

praying for the poor cannot be tolerated

I have watched the video and have listened to the chaplain’s prayer. It is a theologically-solid prayer, much like I have prayed on many occasions. It was not partisan. It just lifted up the Representatives’ responsibility on behalf of the least of these among us. But, that was far too threatening for that august body.

Paul Ryan fired the chaplain  for reflecting the light of Christ in the midst of darkness. Shining the light of Christ’s love in a den of thieves causes them to flee every time.

Standing up for the poor and hungry, especially to the wealthy and powerful elite, is a good way to shorten your career path. It’s also, however, how you stay on the highway to holiness.

Shame on Paul Ryan, and shame on all those in the U.S. House of Representatives who have not stood up against this action.

Mid-terms are coming.

at the feet of the Church

We live in a world blessed by a loving Creator, a world well able to supply all the needs of the human family. That any should lack daily bread is nothing less than sinful. Every malnourished child in our world bears eloquent testimony to the complete lack of Christian values held by our society. I lay this at the feet of the Church.

Why? We have failed to give ourselves on behalf of the poor and hungry, We have failed in our basic purpose of testifying to the Kingdom. We have failed to care.

To be honest (always difficult in the Church), we have actually served to legitimize world views, political and economic systems diametrically opposed to the central message of the Gospel. The Church has closely identified with worldly and cultural power and then has consistently rationalized our position. Our fidelity to the Gospel of Jesus Christ has been completely overshadowed by our desire to be respectable and to fit into society.  Every time a child cries from hunger is a witness to the Church’s lack of faithfulness.

Ending hunger in our world requires leadership. No other organization should be in a better position to provide that leadership than the Church. But until we regain a desire to provide true “good news” for the poor and hungry this will never happen. We have to again come to the place where we understand our role in transforming society.

And even though that is exactly what the Gospel calls us to do, at the moment the Church is far too comfortable to attempt it. We are at peace with the present world systems that hold two-thirds of our family hostage to hunger.  We continue to take our ease and hide behind our stained glass while 25,000 die every day from hunger.  We are far too enamored with the “good life” to care.

We identify with the rich, the powerful, the elite. They are our heroes and role models. We don’t have time for the oppressed, the outcasts, the refugees, the poor, the hungry. Until that changes the Church will continue to wither, totally deserving the lack of respect and interest it receives.  Until that changes we will never end hunger. We will never achieve justice. And there will never be peace in the world.