Tag Archives: goodness

why do you call me good?

Here’s a truism that needs to be repeated until we actually understand it. It’s a truth we should use to determine greatness.

Writing that, my first thoughts turn to our current Presidential campaign. How do the two candidates measure up as good people? Polls tell us they are the two most disliked Presidential candidates in the history of our nation.

One has a lifetime of public service and has a record for consistently standing up for, and fighting for the the least of these among us. The other is a self-serving, billionaire bigot, a racist whose public lying have made global headlines and whose attacks on women, POWs, immigrants, and those with disabilities have brought a new level of shame and disgrace to the American political scene.

Neither are perfect. That’s not the issue for me. Which of these two candidates qualifies as good? Which treats others with love, dignity and respect? The answer seems fairly clear to me.

our prime purpose

.~~Dalai Lama:

How easy it is to forget that business, work, recreation and all our social interaction isn’t the real purpose of our lives. We get caught up in the details and forget that to truly live we need to give ourselves for others.

The Dalai Lama is right. All of us have a thousand opportunities every day to make a real difference in the lives of those most in need, Each of us has the time to make another’s life a little bit better and maybe even a lot better.

We can end hunger in our lifetime. We can change the world forever. It just takes the recognition that we are called to help others, and that despite our superficial differences, we are truly one family.

live alive, my friends

Today is the six month anniversary of my daughter Amy’s death.  I still miss her terribly, as does all her family and friends. And yet, life goes on. Even as I recognize and accept the emptiness left by her passing, I celebrate her life and the fullness with which she lived.

Amy loved life and it showed. She lived alive. She was strong in her illness and faced her passing without fear. For those of us left behind to do anything less would be to dishonor her memory.

Life goes on, but naturally, it will never be the same for those of us who loved her. As a Christian I believe Amy is in a far better place, one prepared by a loving God, a place without pain or suffering. Yet, we all still grieve, and will for a long time to come. That’s to be expected.

But, even in the midst of our grief and feeling of loss there is continued growth. And in that there’s hope and promise. Each of her children carry her spirit, and each in their own unique way reflects Amy’s goodness and love.

Mark Twain wrote that we each need to live in such a way that even the undertaker will be sorry when we die. Amy lived that kind of a life.

Live alive, my friends! Our time here is not a dress rehearsal.