Tag Archives: human rights

repugnant is as repugnant does

Human rights are violated when a tax reform plan lines the already bulging pockets of the rich at the cost of life-saving services for the poor. Human rights are violated when corporations are given precedence over the hungry.

The Republican leaders in Congress have clearly demonstrated that they are unafraid of violating human rights on a massive scale. Their willingness to promote and support unfair economic structures for their own benefit is even more morally repugnant than their continued support and protection of a traitorous president.

Those guilty of either or both should be legally removed from office and tried for treason.

defining characteristics of Facism


If it walks like a duck, and if it quacks like a duck…then it’s time to make some decisions about whether you really like listening to ducks.

walking thru a cow pasture

If you have ever had the pleasure of spending time on a farm or ranch you know what a cow pasture looks and smells like. If you have ever walked through a cow pasture you have ample evidence that it is a home for cows. And, if you are like the majority of us, you avoid stepping in the ample piles of evidence.

Look around, my friends.  The evidence is piling up. Take a deep breath. That pungent aroma is the smell of fresh, still steaming Fascism. You recognize the evidence of cows in a cow pasture. Recognize the evidence of Fascism. Once you step in it,  the smell cannot be removed.

a moral obligation

Save our planet Earth.:

As I focus more on the year ahead, my heart tells me that the struggle is going to be long and hard. That doesn’t bother me. What concerns me most is that we may be too divided to work together for what is best for all of us.

The real debate, as DiCaprio stated back in 2014, is not about partisan politics. The real focus has to be about coming together to address and confront those issues affecting all of our global family. This is a moral obligation that I am not sure we are capable of meeting.

nothing Christian in Xenophobia

Normally, I do not think too highly of resolutions and statements issued by boards and other legislative bodies. Words are cheap. I am much more impressed with action.  However,I applaud this statement by the World Methodist Council.

I have been in South Africa numerous times and have seen firsthand the violence brought about by irrational xenophobia. I also know and am proud to call Ivan Abrahams, and my friend. I have seen him struggle with this issue when he was Bishop of the Methodist Church of South Africa. He has a true heart for the oppressed, the refugee and the stranger in our midst. He is a man of faith and action.

I have also visited with refugees camped in Methodist Church sanctuaries in the heart of Johannesburg. I have heard their stories and felt their fear.

I have seen the anger and rage directed at these refugees. It is too often incited by those with hidden agendas and those whose motives should be held up for closer inspection. It is manufactured on fear and an appeal to nationalism.

Xenophobia is the fear of the stranger. There’s nothing Christian in such a response. Perfect love casts out fear.

World Methodist Council Issues Statement Against Attacks on Foreigners in South Africa

17 April 2015


Peace March in Durban, South Africa on 16 April 2016.
Photo Credit: KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Government

In the wake of escalating violence against foreign nationals, refugees and asylum seekers in the Republic of South Africa, World Methodist Council representatives express concern and disappointment at these clear violations of human rights. General Secretary Ivan Abrahams and the Social Justice Committee of the World Methodist Council issued this joint statement today condemning the violence and attacks:The World Methodist Council condemns these attacks which so clearly undermine human rights and dignity. We applaud the actions of Methodist family members within the Republic of South Africa who have stood up against these human rights violations.  We also welcome the recent statements of President Zuma and senior government officials. We further support the marches and events held to bring awareness to take a stance against such atrocities. We pray that they are successful in continuing to promote initiatives toward peaceful coexistence. We implore the South African government to protect the rights of all people as enshrined in its Constitution. We further call on Methodists and Wesleyans within the neighboring countries of South Africa to stand in solidarity with and aid all those affected by these attacks. We are one human race. Let us all continue to pray and speak out against the injustices throughout our world.

without food…

“Without food, all other components of social justice are meaningless.” – Norman Borlaug

An estimated 925 million people in the world are undernourished, meaning they are deprived of some or all nutritional elements necessary for human health.

We know that poverty, the principal cause of undernourishment, is brought about by conflict, unequal income distribution, lack of resources, harmful economic systems, climate change, and is perpetuated by hunger itself.

The father of the Green Revolution couldn’t be more correct in this pointed assessment.

We will never end hunger by feeding people…but that is where the vision of a world without hunger must begin. Ending hunger has to be the foundation of any plan, process or strategy aimed at achieving social justice.

Once there is food, other issues can be addressed, and definitely should be. But until there is daily bread nothing else matters.

Good News to one who is hungry is not salvation, human rights or even world peace. Good News to one who is hungry is only one word: food.


We are ending hunger. We are making progress toward a world without hunger. It needs to be faster, but we can claim progress.

Even though over a billion of our human family still live in extreme poverty, and almost 850 million of those go hungry every day. the number of hungry around the world has significantly dropped over the past twenty years. That’s progress.

But…it should be more. We should be much further along in erasing such needless suffering.

We know we have more than enough food to feed every person on the planet. We have all the resources and knowledge necessary to achieve food security for all. Why then hasn’t it happened? What needs to happen before we care enough to act?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime a goal for every member of the human family?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime the central tenet for global cooperation among governments?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime a issue raised by every political leader?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime at the top of every human rights agenda?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime understood as a spiritual issue?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime the focus of all of the world’s religions?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime taught in every school?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime worthy of headline news?

Why isn’t ending hunger in our lifetime important enough to act?