Tag Archives: intentionality

sucking the marrow of life

Dead Poets Society quotes - We Do it Together - 博客大巴:

My father was 85 when he was killed on a Texas highway. Another car plowed into his from behind. The other car was driven by a nurse late to work and heavily medicated. She survived with minor injuries.

My father was working at the time of his death. That’s not surprising to me. He grew up in a poor single parent family during the depression. He and his siblings knew hunger. For my father, to be a man meant you worked. And so he worked. He worked until the day he day he died.

Good meaningful work is a key part of our humanity. But, there’s far more to life than being busy. Work is not the end all and the be all of our existence.

Now, at almost 70 I am taking Thoreau’s admonition to heart  I have come to realize that going into the woods is vital if I am to live deeply and suck the marrow of life. The more time I spend immersed in nature, the more alive I feel.

Take time to live before you die. As someone recently told me, “This isn’t a dress rehearsal.” We only get one chance.

a dream of authentic community

“I continue to dream and pray about a revival of holiness in our day that moves forth in mission and creates authentic community in which each person can be unleashed through the empowerment of the Spirit to fulfill God’s creational intentions.”
John Wesley, How To Pray: The Best of John Wesley on Prayer     

Holiness is not a word we use much in contemporary society. Webster says it means the state of being holy–no surprise there. But there’s many of us that have only the vaguest notion of what that implies.

Again, Mr. Webster states that the best definition of the word “holy” is “Belonging to, derived from, or associated with divine power; sacred.”  Other definitions of the word include: “worthy of worship or high esteem” or “living according to a religious or spiritual system.” There are several other lesser used meanings as well.

So what Wesley was dreaming of, what he was praying for, was a renewal of divine power, a return to a spiritual lifestyle of true community. And even though that 18th century dream might seem quaint to us today, what Wesley yearned for is the answer to many of our world’s greatest and most challenging problems.

No one goes hungry in an authentic community based on living a spiritual lifestyle centered on loving one another more than we love ourselves.

I share Wesley’s dream. And I continue to pray for the day when we have an authentic global community, a community where God’s creational intentions are fulfilled for the entire human family and all of creation.