Tag Archives: knowledge

our knowledge is begging to be used

We already know too much about the #BLOTUS. We all know his history, his character, and his self-absorbed lifestyle of greed, bigotry and selfishness. We also know of his inability to properly lead our nation. We know his complain disdain for our laws and his continuing practice of bending them, breaking them, and completely ignoring them. We know he is a pathological liar. We all know he is unfit to hold the office of president of the United States.

But, knowledge is of no value unless we put it into practice. Chekhov is right on this point. Why, then, hasn’t the #BLOTUS already been impeached?

 

power, propaganda, and the loss of freedom

I recently allowed myself the pleasure of rereading Orwell’s 1984. I am so glad I did since we are now seeing it unfold right before us. We are actually entering into the virtual reality of living in the 1984 world.

Animal Farm is next on my reread list. Like 1984, I know I will enjoy the book again. And also like 1984, I know I am going to see lessons that are reflected in the world in which we now find ourselves.

I want to reread some of these classics while I still have the freedom to do so. The way things are going that might not be possible in the near future.

BLOTUS has been in office less than a full week, and the fourth estate is already “the opposition” and “the enemy.” First silence the press. Then silence free speech. Lie, lie, lie and keep on repeating the lies until even the absurd begins to sound reasonable.

And in the end, do whatever is necessary to eliminate dissent.

 

the wages of sin

I have blogged about the 7 deadly sins before. However, I felt the time was right for a gentle reminder.

These words of Gandhi are especially meaningful at this point in our country’s history. We are fully embracing and living out all 7 of these deadly sins, and there’s a terrible price to be paid.

The consequences for our nation are already being felt, and they will only get worse. We continue to create a dark future for ourselves and our children. And the price grows ever higher.

The wages of sin don’t go down…and there’s no defaulting on the payments.

when we know better

This is good advice for all of us. We have to start where we are, doing the best we can. Once we learn a better way then we can incorporate that. The most important point is that to do the best we can means that we must start. We must begin. Action, not thought is required to get better at anything.

movers & shakers

All mankind is divided into three classes: those that are immovable, those that are moveable, and those that move. — Arabian Proverb

I don’t remember where I first came across this proverb, but it’s always stuck with me as a powerfully concise description of how society as a whole deals with issues of every size.

There are always those who are not even interested. They simply do not care about the issue. There are those that care enough to be interested, and maybe even concerned enough to learn about the issue. Then there are those few who care enough to actually find a way to impact the issue.

Ending hunger in our lifetime requires that third class of people.  We need movers and shakers.

Those of us who care enough to act have to do what we can on behalf of the hungry. We need to actually move.

It’s not enough to know about hunger and poverty. We have to take that knowledge and use on behalf of those most in need. We need more movers.

So, the questions I leave with you this morning are simple ones. The proverb states there are three classes of people.

When it comes to ending hunger in our lifetime, what class are you?

Do you even care? Do you care enough to be interested and maybe even moved? Do you care enough to be a mover and a shaker, one of the class of people that will help change the world forever?

 

never say that you did not know

You may choose to look the other way but you can never say that you did not know – Wilbur Wilberforce

Wilberforce (1759 – 1833) was an English politician, philanthropist, and a leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade. He began his political career in 1780, eventually becoming the independent member of Parliament for Yorkshire. In 1785, he underwent a conversion experience and became an evangelical Christian, which resulted in major changes to his lifestyle and a lifelong concern for reform. In 1787, he came into contact with Thomas Clarkson and a group of anti-slave-trade activists. Wilberforce was persuaded to take on the cause of abolition, and he soon became one of the leading English abolitionists. He headed the parliamentary campaign against the British slave trade for twenty-six years until the passage of the Slave Trade Act of 1807.

Wilberforce was convinced of the importance of religion, morality and education. He championed causes and campaigns such as the Society for the Suppression of Vice, British missionary work in India, the creation of a free colony in Sierra Leone the foundation of the Christian Mission Society, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. His underlying conservatism led him to support politically and socially repressive legislation, and resulted in criticism that he was ignoring injustices at home while campaigning for the enslaved abroad.

Twenty years later, Wilberforce supported the campaign for the complete abolition of slavery, and continued his involvement after 1826, when he resigned from Parliament because of his failing health. That campaign led to the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833, which abolished slavery in most of the British Empire; Wilberforce died just three days after hearing that the passage of the Act through Parliament was assured.

too much talkin’ and not enough doing (part 2)

As I was thinking about my last post, too much talkin’ and not enough doing, I remembered a quote by the noted Jewish theologian and philosopher, Martin Buber. Buber wrote:

The greater the crisis becomes, the more earnest and consciously responsible is the knowledge demanded of us for although what is demanded is a deed, only the deed which is born of knowledge will help to overcome the crisis.

We definitely need more action on behalf of the poor and hungry. But, as Buber pointedly reminds us, those deeds must be informed by knowledge. In order to achieve a world without hunger in our lifetime we need the best information available on which to base a solid and responsible course of action.”Francis Bacon wrote, “For knowledge, too, is in itself power.”

That power of solid knowledge is what we need to create a global movement committed to ending the horror of 25,000 of our human family dying daily from hunger in the midst of a world of plenty.