Tag Archives: lifetime

a painful truth

The lawyer for President of the United States has publicly declared that Trump could kill a public official and not be indicted. I expect that under a dictatorship or in a two-bit banana republic, not in a nation where the rule of law is honored.

Surely I am not alone in my outrage. When is this going to stop? It is time for us to decide what kind of country we want.

the power of your example

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It’s never been about what we say we believe. In reality, what we say matters little. All of us have our opinions, even if many of us are silent and never verbally express our feelings.

What truly matters is how we live. What we do has power, real power. There is eloquence in action that speaks louder than anything we may say.

We need to care enough to take action. When that happens we will begin changing the world.

Talking about ending hunger and poverty is good. But it’s not enough. Let’s use 2016 to come together and ¬†continue to set the example of how to end hunger in our lifetime.

a precious gift

I agree with the Merry Monk. Peace is a precious gift that we long for even though it’s already within reach.

The difficulty is that loving others is too often blocked by our selfishness, greed, and political self interest. Friends do not allow friends to die of hunger or live in impoverished squalor.

Peace cannot be achieved without a solid foundation of justice. And there can be no justice while we allow 25,000 of our human family to die daily from lack of proper nutrition.

Peace is, indeed, within our grasp. Ending hunger in our lifetime is the first step toward making it happen.

saved by hope

Nothing that is worth doing can be achieved in our lifetime; therefore we must be saved by hope. — Reinhold Niebuhr

In yesterday’s post, saved by faith, I shared some of why Reinhold Niebuhr is one of my favorite theologians. I want to continue that this morning.

Niebuhr’s Christian idealism was forged on the anvil of of modern industry. Serving a 13 year pastorate in Detroit taught him firsthand the perils of a pious unreality disconnected from the everyday world of real life. That led him to a passionate concern with the practical bearing of Christianity on the ever present political and economic problems of his day.

The value of Niebuhr’s theology for me is that he shows that no matter how important the church’s work is in saving men and women from the sins of the world, the church still must function in the world. It is a social institution. That means its achievements and its limitations needs the same critical examination as other social institutions.

The church should provide the indispensable resources necessary for the building of a good and moral society. Without the moral foundation provided by the gospel (which has to be a social gospel) we can never hope to achieve the vision of an ideal society where love and justice is fully realized. But, when the church is successful in providing those resources there is real hope.

Whenever religion concerns itself with the problems of society, it always gives birth to some kind of millennial hope, from the perspective of which present social realities are convicted of inadequacy, and courage is maintained to continue the effort to redeem society of injustice.