Tag Archives: moral values

take action now

The following article is from GLOBAL CITIZEN. It is a call to action, asking for the signing of a letter to the President to reverse his executive order for extreme vetting. This is a simple way to take immediate action that reflects the moral values we hold as people of faith.

Reverse President Trump’s Executive Order to Ban Refugees

The United States has just slammed its doors on the world’s most vulnerable.

On January 27th, President Donald Trump signed an executive order, implementing extreme vetting of refugees who enter the country.

It suspends the entire US refugee program for 120 days as new “extreme vetting” rules are developed, even though America already has the toughest vetting program for refugees in the world.

It halves America’s refugee intake to a maximum of 50,000 annually, with a complete ban on admitting refugees from war-torn Syria.

It stops seven predominantly Muslim nationalities – Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen – from even visiting America. This includes dual-nationals, green card holders, and most visa-holders.

As Global Citizens, we know that opposing viewpoints are a vital part of any robust political discussion. We work with all sides of politics to ensure that governments continue play a leading role in ending extreme poverty.

However, there are basic values that weave the fabric of the American Democracy – like not discriminating on the basis of religion and nationality.

This policy crosses that line.

Refugees are the most vulnerable fellow citizens on our planet, fleeing unimaginable horrors of conflict, persecution and disaster.

These are fathers, mothers, sons, and daughters.

We, as global citizens, stand proudly as supporters of refugee communities and vulnerable populations, regardless of religion or national origin.

We must call President Trump out on his actions and ensure that refugees can have place to call home.

the shame of all

I have often stated that hunger is not a problem. And I stand by that statement.

But, if hunger is not a problem, what, exactly, is it? Is it a social ill? Is it a political issue? Is it a spiritual issue?

We live in a perfectly created world with more than enough resources to supply the needs of every member of our human family. This has been true now for over 50 years. Yet, we allow over 25,000 people to die every day because they do not receive enough food to keep them alive.

How is that possible? What does that say about our humanity?

Hunger is an obscenity. It’s the most vile vulgarity uttered on our planet. And there is simply no excuse for any of us.

Every single child that cries herself to sleep from the pain of an empty stomach is a damning indictment of our frightening lack of moral values, both as individuals and of society as a whole. We would do well to remember that,

“The hunger of one is the shame of all.”

the loss of a moral champion

The world  has lost one of its true giants. Even though I knew it would soon happen, I was stunned yesterday when I heard of Nelson Mandela’s passing.

Like so many others of my generation, Nelson Mandela was a larger-than-life hero to me. He was in the ranks of Mother Theresa, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Desmond Tutu as real people who lived out their beliefs and never flinched when facing the ugly reality of global injustice. He was a flesh and blood champion of the poor and oppressed and demonstrated that one person can make a real difference in the world.

Living out his convictions, Nelson Mandela was a leader that helped change the world. He was a champion of peace, and never ceased to fight against injustice and hatred. Mandela recognized that hunger needed to be addressed as a moral issue. He was a constant inspiration to me and I have often used his wisdom and words in my writing. Was he perfect? Certainly not. But he was truly one of the greatest men of our time, and our world is a smaller, meaner place without him.

So today, with the rest of the world, I mourn the loss of a courageous leader and moral hero.  The following is an excerpt from a news release from the United Nations WFP.

The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today is mourning the loss of President Nelson Mandela. WFP, in a statement today said Mandela was “a champion against injustice and a true ally in the fight against hunger.”

Mandela delivered a special message to WFP’s staff in 2004, stating, “Hunger is an issue of social justice and not economics. Our economic approach to food and its distribution reflects our basic moral values. There are relatively poor countries where almost everyone is reasonably fed and richer ones where there is widespread malnutrition. The economic systems in these countries vary. Those who have succeeded have done so because they have made it a priority to end it. Hunger is a moral issue.”

May he rest in peace.