Tag Archives: new book

a hundred ways to kneel

Let the beauty we love be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground. ~ Rumi

This beautiful quote by one of my favorite poets is especially meaningful to me this morning as I have been reading through the final printed proof of my newest book, The Language of Love. A book of ecstatic poetry in the Sufi tradition, it is my spin on contemporizing the attraction we all have for the great lover. I am planning to have the official release by the beginning of September, both for Amazon and Kindle.

the stuggle to fill empty pews

GETTING OFF OUR BUTS: Making Mission Happen is scheduled to be published the first week of July. It begins with a look at our understanding of miracles, and the alarming lack of them in today’s churches. Here is a brief snippet.

There are many who believe the church is no longer relevant for today’s society. Theologians, biblical scholars and church leaders bemoan the fact that the world at large doesn’t seem interested in what the church has to offer. One campaign after another is introduced to fill nearly empty sanctuaries and help dwindling congregations grow.

None of them appear to have offered a lasting solution. Why?  Again, the answer is disturbingly simple.

None of the ubiquitous church growth campaigns really work because none of them truly focus on the real problem. Today’s church has yet to adequately demonstrate to the world that we have anything worth their attention.

 The church needs to understand that the world is not obligated to pay attention to us. It is just that simple. Thinking we have what the world needs and demonstrating it are two completely different things.

If the world can see nothing in the church that cannot be explained in terms of management, program and organization, how is that any different than what takes place outside the church every single day?

 For most people church still implies God. And for most of the world God still means miracle. A church without miracles is no different than any other small business, corporation or well-meaning civic club. The world knows what to expect from them. Yet, the world doesn’t know what to expect from the church.

 Once the church merits the world listening to us we will get the audience we crave and deserve. Until that time comes, however, the struggle to fill empty pews will continue unabated.