Tag Archives: philosophy

no, Donald. a lie is a lie is a lie

#TRUMPFAIL  #StopTrump  #TrumpsAmerica  #TrumpTyranny #DictatorDonald

One thing we all know, that the #BLOTUS is not a philosopher. If he could have a conversation with Plato it would certainly be a Comedy Central Special. But long before the conclusion of the conversation I imagine Plato would be tearing his toga and ordering the same drink given to his mentor, Socrates. And, without a doubt, he would ask for a double.

longer tables!

This Facebook post is a perfect illustration of my philosophy. Life is not about hording and keeping what we have received. Life in all its fullness only comes through being open and generous. Caring, sharing and giving makes life worthwhile.

A truly thankful heart is one that wants others the enjoy the same gifts we have received. Sharing, even a meager crust, is far better than eating a banquet alone. We don’t need thicker walls and taller fences. We need longer tables.

the loser’s tool

Socrates:

Is there any politician in recent US history that has been a bigger liar, or has used slander more than the man currently in the office of President? I think not.

It doesn’t take a philosopher to realize the danger of allowing such a person as the #BLOTUS to hold the reins of power. The leader of the free world needs to be a person of the highest moral character and a person of unquestionable integrity. Neither of these characteristics describe the #BLOTUS.

My hope is that his continuously plummeting  approval ratings are a indication that more and more of my fellow citizens are coming to understand just how unfit this man is to have the highest office in the land. He should not be allowed to continue flaunting his dictatorial disdain for our opinions nor our laws.

The #BLOTUS is not only the Biggest Liar in the US. He’s the biggest loser. And that’s why slander is his favorite tool.

getting enough

Desire Less:

How many of us have bought into the philosophy that the one with the most toys wins? Our entire society operates on the principle that our lives would be so much better, and that we as individuals would be more complete, if we could just get the next best thing.

We have been brainwashed into believing that we must buy more to live. We live to buy rather than buying to live. The issue I have with this lifestyle is that it isn’t Christian, and in a world of poverty and hunger, it is actually immoral.

If our spirituality actually informs our lifestyle we should be striving to live more simply. That’s what Chesterton is saying. Desiring less is the best way to have enough. By living more simply we make it possible for others to simply live.

Our world was created perfectly. There is enough resources to meet our needs, but there will never be enough to meet our greed.

saved by faith

Nothing which is true or beautiful or good makes complete sense in any immediate context of history; therefore we must be saved by faith. — Reinhold Niehubr

Reinhold Niebuhr has long been one of my favorite theologians. He was a true religious leader. His intellectual power and capacity to realistically deal with the social issues of his day ranks him among the ablest of philosophers, as well. He was a Christian idealist that demonstrated the essential spirit of Christianity.

Through his early experience as a pastor for thirteen years in Detroit, Niebuhr developed his own interpretation of Christianity. He came to understand that the true meaning of the gospel was in direct conflict with most of the customs and attitudes of contemporary society.

Niebuhr finally reached the conclusion that the church cannot save a person’s soul without addressing the kind of life they live in the world. That’s when the Christian gospel became a social gospel for him.

And what is so compelling for me about Niebuhr is that he fully understood that Christianity could not be allowed to be seen only as vague generalities.

That the ministry is particularly tempted to the self-deceptions which afflict the moral life of Christians today is obvious. If it is dangerous to entertain great moral ideals without attempting to realize them in life, it is even more perilous to proclaim them in abstract terms without bringing them into juxtaposition with the specific social and moral issues of the day.

But, as shown by the opening quote, even Niehubr’s passionate concern for Christianity to have a direct and practical impact of the economic and social issues of his day never displaced his deep and essential religious faith. That’s the power of Christian idealism.