Tag Archives: selfishness

could there be a greater difference?

This is why I continue to be amazed, confused, and just totally dismayed by the huge numbers of those professing to follow Jesus that actually voted for the #BLOTUS and still support him. Anyone who is seeking to demonstrate the love of Christ, cannot possibly think that this man reflects anything other than the complete and total repudiation of all that Christ is and that He teaches.

The values of Drumpf are not Christian values. The #BLOTUS does not demonstrate any of the values taught by Jesus. Those ignoring these facts need to seriously reflect on just how shallow their spirituality must be to defend and support such a man.

our knowledge is begging to be used

We already know too much about the #BLOTUS. We all know his history, his character, and his self-absorbed lifestyle of greed, bigotry and selfishness. We also know of his inability to properly lead our nation. We know his complain disdain for our laws and his continuing practice of bending them, breaking them, and completely ignoring them. We know he is a pathological liar. We all know he is unfit to hold the office of president of the United States.

But, knowledge is of no value unless we put it into practice. Chekhov is right on this point. Why, then, hasn’t the #BLOTUS already been impeached?

 

a question of self-improvement

Self- improvement is always a hot topic. For many of us it’s a question of physical well-being, cosmetics, or mental capacity. All of those are good and have their place. But, Franklin understood that true self-improvement has to go far deeper.

The most meaningful self-improvement must focus on stretching our ability to see beyond ourselves. The old saying is true than “A man wrapped up in himself makes a very small package.”

Franklin knew that a focus on doing for others, serving the greater good, reaching outward and keeping our focus beyond ourselves, will reap the greatest benefits of self-improvement. It’s a valuable lesson for the self-centered age in which we now live.

Tonight, before turning out the lights ask yourself: “What good have I done today?

a prayer for the rich

God of mercy and justice, we praise you this perfect day for all the gifts you have given your children. We glorify your name for your sustaining grace and the everlasting love poured so freely into our lives. You have given us so much, and for everything we have and all that we are, we give you our thanks.

Our prayer this morning is for the grace to more fully respond to the love and grace you have first given us. Help us always remember, and always be aware that all we have comes from you.

We have been so richly blessed with material abundance. We have financial wealth unimaginable by most of our human family. We take solid shelter and good homes for granted in a world teeming with refugees and the homeless. Food security is never an issue for our families Instead, we complain about variety and search out ever newer and exotic meals. We spend without thought, and eat to excess in a world full of poor and hungry.

Forgive us, Lord, for our thoughtlessness. Forgive us for our lack of awareness. Forgive us for our continued misuse of the gifts so freely bestowed upon us. Forgive us for our lack of caring… and our lack of sharing.

Lord, open our eyes so that we might see our world through your eyes. Grant us compassion deep enough to bring us to our knees in true empathy with those of our family chained by poverty and hunger. Grant us the miracle-working power of your Holy Spirit to lift us above our self-centeredness, our selfishness and fears so that we might love the least of these among us enough to open ourselves fully enough to share not only all we have…but all we are. Lord, teach us this morning how to be generous, and to give as you have first given to us.

Grant us more generous hearts. Help us more fully reflect your love through our caring and our sharing. And let all we have been given be used to glorify you. Amen

a precious gift

I agree with the Merry Monk. Peace is a precious gift that we long for even though it’s already within reach.

The difficulty is that loving others is too often blocked by our selfishness, greed, and political self interest. Friends do not allow friends to die of hunger or live in impoverished squalor.

Peace cannot be achieved without a solid foundation of justice. And there can be no justice while we allow 25,000 of our human family to die daily from lack of proper nutrition.

Peace is, indeed, within our grasp. Ending hunger in our lifetime is the first step toward making it happen.

some unbearable things

Some things you must always be unable to bear, Some things you must never stop refusing to bear. Injustice and outrage and dishonor and shame. No matter how young you are or how old you have got. Not for kudos and not for cash, your picture in the paper nor money in the bank, neither. Just refuse to bear them. – William Faulkner

What a different world we could have if more of us took Faulkner’s words to heart. I often find myself in tears over the open and even brazen acceptance of injustice, especially by those who claim to follow the Prince of Peace.

Our love of money and all it can provide, our insatiable desire for more and bigger, has brought us to the place where we turn a blind eye to the evil of those in power and wink at wrong doing on a personal level. We live in a world where there’s no shame, and where honor can no longer be spelled, much less defined.

Our greed and selfishness have even stripped us our ability for outrage. We now are part of a society where outrage over injustice is more unacceptable that the injustice that spawns it.

Over 25,000 of our human family will die of hunger and hunger related caused today. In a world with far more than enough food for everyone of us, we will simply go about our business as usual. Our only outrage will be when we get cut off in traffic, the server get our lunch order wrong, or our our double-expresso latte gets cold.

I honestly do not know how much longer I can bear it.

 

 

our last piece of bread

We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way. — Victor Frankl

Heroism comes in many guises. It’s not always the bravery of a soldier giving his life for his comrades or the selfless actions of a firefighter risking her life to save a child from a burning building.

As Frankl so eloquently describes, there are heroes who simply do what they can to comfort others in their time of need. The do whatever they are able to make pain more bearable and offer whatever hope they can bring.

All of us have the freedom to be that hero. All of us can carry hope. We are not asked to give away our last piece of bread. But, as Frankl points out, we all have the freedom to choose our own way.

What will we choose today? Will we turn selfishly inward, or will we choose to care enough to be the bringers of comfort to those in need?