Tag Archives: Shakespeare

just fix it

Fix it.:

Worry fixes nothing wrote Hemingway. Do you agree? I do.

Worry is nothing but another form of fear. And although a little fear isn’t necessarily a bad thing, we can never let if immobilize us. “Action is eloquence,” wrote Shakespeare, and again, experience has taught me that taking action cuts through any fear or worry.

When we see something that is wrong there’s no need to worry or fret about it. Let’s just fix it.

struck by a poisoned arrow

The Buddha always told his disciples not to waste their time and energy in metaphysical speculation.  Whenever he was asked a metaphysical question, he remained silent.  Instead, he directed his disciples toward practical efforts…He once said, “Suppose a man is struck by a poisoned arrow and the doctor wishes to take the arrow out immediately.  Suppose the man does not want the arrow removed until he knows who shot it, his age, his parents and why he shot it.  What would happen?  If he were to wait until all these questions have been answered, the man might die first.”  Life is so short.  It must not be spent in endless metaphysical speculation that does not bring us any closer to the truth. – Thich Nhat Hanh

How much time do we waste every day that could be used in helping change the world into a place where love reigns and justice flows like a mighty stream? Thich Nhat Hanh points out a universal truth. There are times when our endless questions cause far great harm than we can imagine.

We are surrounded by those struck by the poisoned arrows of oppression, poverty and hunger. First let’s remove the arrows. Then we can find those responsible.

As Shakespeare wrote, “Action is eloquence.” Make today an eloquent day. Take action on behalf of one of our family that needs your help to survive.

Valentine’s Day fast approaches

As we approach Valentine’s Day I would like to recommend the First Letter of John in the New Testament as a good resource. The writer provides some powerful insights into the true nature of love.

John talks about what love looks like and how it acts. He talks about true love, and what love is and isn’t. He talks about loving God and loving one another, and how there cannot be one without the other.

John gives us clear instructions on loving one another and why. He even tells us how to love, which the great bard, himself, picked up on and used in The Two Gentlemen of Verona when he penned “They do not love that do not show their love.”

I am pretty sure that is Shakespeare’s paraphrase of I John 3:18, where John tells us, “Little children, let us not love with word or with tongue, but in deed and truth.”

I only wish that Shakespeare would have included the 17th verse as well, which is what verse 18 refers to. The two verses need to be read together.

But whoever has the world’s goods, and sees his brother in need and closes his heart against him, how does the love of God abide in him? Little children, let us not love with word or tongue, but in deed and truth.

Valentine’s Day fast approaches, and the writer of First John is a good resource to help us celebrate the day appropriately, even if he doesn’t mention candy, roses or sentimental greeting cards.