Tag Archives: sick

stigmatize the deserving

The truth!

There are always those that must have someone to look down on. That’s not new or news. And we all know that the poor are mostly powerless to defend themselves. That makes them the target of choice for a variety of social ills.

Having voluntarily lived in poverty, myself, and have worked with and walked along side the poor of the world for almost five decades, I have a fairly strong understanding of their struggle. The vast majority of those living in poverty around the world consistently work harder that most of us can begin to comprehend.

The true culprit is the unadulterated greed of those of us who are wealthy beyond measure. We see unlimited wealth as a right, not a gift, and we refuse to share our abundance. Any professing Christian pointing to the poor as a problem is not believer in Jesus Christ and has certainly never met the Jesus of the Gospels.

 

could there be a greater difference?

This is why I continue to be amazed, confused, and just totally dismayed by the huge numbers of those professing to follow Jesus that actually voted for the #BLOTUS and still support him. Anyone who is seeking to demonstrate the love of Christ, cannot possibly think that this man reflects anything other than the complete and total repudiation of all that Christ is and that He teaches.

The values of Drumpf are not Christian values. The #BLOTUS does not demonstrate any of the values taught by Jesus. Those ignoring these facts need to seriously reflect on just how shallow their spirituality must be to defend and support such a man.

the great divide

What a wonderful illustration of the great divide. This delightful cartoon tells the story of one of my favorite quotes.

“The distance between us and the poor is the distance between us and God.” 

A church that is happy and taking its ease during these times is a church that doesn’t comprehend the love of God, or the gospel of Jesus Christ. And any Christian leader that isn’t outraged at our government’s treatment of the poor and marginalized needs to wake up and pay attention.

 

a prayer for world peace

 

A Prayer for World Peace

by Jane Goodall

 

We pray to the great Spiritual Power in which
we live and move and have our being.
We pray that we may at all times
keep our minds open to new ideas and shun dogma;
that we may grow in our understanding of the nature of all living beings
and our connectedness with the natural world;
that we may become ever more filled with
generosity of spirit and true compassion and love for all life;
that we may strive to heal the hurts that we have inflicted on nature
and control our greed for material things, knowing that
our actions are harming our natural world and the future of our children;
that we may value each and every human being
for who he is, for who she is,
reaching to the spirit that is within,
knowing the power of each individual to change the world.We pray for social justice,
for the alleviation of the crippling poverty
that condemns millions of people around the world
to lives of misery – hungry, sick, and utterly without hope.
We pray for the children who are starving,
who are condemned to homelessness, slave labor, and prostitution,
and especially for those forced to fight, to kill and torture
even members of their own family.
We pray for the victims of violence and war,
for those wounded in body and for those wounded in mind.
We pray for the multitudes of refugees, forced from their homes to alien places
through war or through the utter destruction of their environment.We pray for suffering animals everywhere,
for an end to the pain caused by scientific experimentation,
intensive farming, fur farming, shooting, trapping,
training for entertainment, abusive pet owners,
and all other forms of exploitation
such as overloading and overworking pack animals,
bull fighting, badger baiting, dog and cock fighting and so many more.We pray for an end to cruelty,
whether to humans or other animals,
for an end to bullying, and torture in all its forms.
We pray that we may learn the peace that comes with forgiving
and the strength we gain in loving;
that we may learn to take nothing for granted in this life;
that we may learn to see and understand with our hearts;
that we may learn to rejoice in our being.We pray for these things with humility;
We pray because of the hope that is within us,
and because of a faith in the ultimate triumph of the human spirit;
We pray because of our love for Creation, and because of our trust in God.
We pray, above all, for peace throughout the world.

willful blindness is a deadly sin

The article that follows is from the Huffington Post, and is another great example of a Church leader taking a powerful stand. It is decidedly refreshing,  and a sign of hope that we have leaders who will call a spade a spade and who demonstrate leadership on critical issues of our time.

Climate change and global warming impacts all of us. It is especially severe on those who have the least ability to mitigate its deadly effects. Those who intentionally turn a blind eye to climate change and its impacts on the poor and hungry are harming us all and helping destroy God’s perfect creation. And like the good bishop said, that is sin.

Head Of The Episcopal Church Says It’s ‘Sinful’ To Ignore Climate Change

KATHERINE JEFFERTS SCHORI

The presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church had strong words this week for people who deny climate change based on “political interests” or “willful blindness.”

“The Judeo-Christian tradition has always called those motivations sinful,” Bishop Katherine Jefferts Schori said Tuesday at an event to raise awareness about climate change. “It’s decidedly wrong to use resources that have been given into our collective care in ways that diminish the ability of others to share in abundant life.”

Speaking at an Episcopal Church event in Los Angeles called The Climate Change Crisis, Jefferts Schori said that humanity has reached a “life and death” decision to change the tide of climate change and that the window of opportunity “will not last long.”

“We are making war on the integrity of this planet,” she said. “We were planted in this garden to care for it, literally to have dominion over its creatures. Dominion means caring for our island home.”

Tuesday’s event kicked off a 30-day challenge for people to learn about and advocate for environmental change. Over the course of the initiative, which ends on Earth Day, April 22, participants who sign up on the Episcopal Church’s website will receive daily emails with information to help them reduce their carbon footprint and spread awareness about climate initiatives in their communities.

Climate protection is an issue of personal interest for Jefferts Schori, who has a doctorate in oceanography and worked as a marine biologist before entering the priesthood in 1994. The bishop is a backpacker and nature lover who has studied interconnected systems like the circulation of water, the atmosphere and marine geology.

The Episcopal Church as a whole has made environmental stewardship a top priority. The Episcopal Ecological Network was formed in 1986 to provide educational resources to Episcopal churches around the U.S. and build grassroots efforts to address environmental issues in communities.

In 2012 the church partnered with interfaith environmental nonprofit GreenFaith to launch a certification program for Episcopal churches around the country to make their worship and educational facilities more environmentally friendly.

“We are meant to love God and what God has created and to love our neighbors as ourselves,” Jefferts Schori said Tuesday. “Jesus insists that those who will enjoy abundant life are those who care for all neighbors, especially the ‘least of these’ — the hungry and thirsty, the imprisoned and sick — and that must include all the species that God has nurtured on this planet.”