Tag Archives: SPCA

Migrant Child Detention – WWJD

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Both the Jewish and the Christian faiths makes it clear that we are to welcome the stranger, and provide special care for the weak among us. The current polices of intentionally splitting up families, especially of those seeking asylum in our country, are profoundly wrong.

Regardless of the purpose of such policies, ripping children away from their parents and detaining them in mass incarceration centers cannot be justified. Where is the outrage from people of faith at such intentional trauma to innocents?

Far too much of evangelical Christianity has become a cult of blind praise and support of the current president’s golden calf racist policies. It is time to again ask WWJD. It certainly would not be to split children from their mothers and put them into kennels.

never say that you did not know

You may choose to look the other way but you can never say that you did not know – Wilbur Wilberforce

Wilberforce (1759 – 1833) was an English politician, philanthropist, and a leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade. He began his political career in 1780, eventually becoming the independent member of Parliament for Yorkshire. In 1785, he underwent a conversion experience and became an evangelical Christian, which resulted in major changes to his lifestyle and a lifelong concern for reform. In 1787, he came into contact with Thomas Clarkson and a group of anti-slave-trade activists. Wilberforce was persuaded to take on the cause of abolition, and he soon became one of the leading English abolitionists. He headed the parliamentary campaign against the British slave trade for twenty-six years until the passage of the Slave Trade Act of 1807.

Wilberforce was convinced of the importance of religion, morality and education. He championed causes and campaigns such as the Society for the Suppression of Vice, British missionary work in India, the creation of a free colony in Sierra Leone the foundation of the Christian Mission Society, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. His underlying conservatism led him to support politically and socially repressive legislation, and resulted in criticism that he was ignoring injustices at home while campaigning for the enslaved abroad.

Twenty years later, Wilberforce supported the campaign for the complete abolition of slavery, and continued his involvement after 1826, when he resigned from Parliament because of his failing health. That campaign led to the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833, which abolished slavery in most of the British Empire; Wilberforce died just three days after hearing that the passage of the Act through Parliament was assured.