Tag Archives: Sufism

The Language of Love

As I mentioned on yesterday’s post I am excited to be working on the final proof of my latest book, The Language of Love: Ecstatic Poems in the Sufi Tradition. This isn’t a book filled with romance and passionate liaisons. Instead it is a collection  of Sufi inspired poems dedicated to the ecstatic joy of the all-encompassing love of God. The poems take their form from the works of the Sufi masters, such as Rumi, Hafiz and others, but are crafted to speak in a tone we all can understand.

My goal for the book is for readers to be immersed in the reality of God’s presence, and to understand that all creation is a love note from the heart of God. It’s a different perspective on spirituality, but one I feel is desperately needed.

I’ve attempted to cut through the heart of religious doctrine in The Language of Love, and demonstrate the pure, simple truth of our oneness with the divine. And, hopefully, in less than a month, The Language of Love will be available on both Amazon and Kindle.

a hundred ways to kneel

Let the beauty we love be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground. ~ Rumi

This beautiful quote by one of my favorite poets is especially meaningful to me this morning as I have been reading through the final printed proof of my newest book, The Language of Love. A book of ecstatic poetry in the Sufi tradition, it is my spin on contemporizing the attraction we all have for the great lover. I am planning to have the official release by the beginning of September, both for Amazon and Kindle.

boils and scabies (and the Golden Rule)

I love Sufi poetry, and Rumi and Hafiz have long been favorites. I recently came across this delightful quote by Rumi and I share it now because of its timeliness in my own life.

When a man has boils or scabies,, he isn’t disgusted with himself; he puts his infected hand in his dish and he licks his fingers without any repugnance. But, if he sees a small sore on someone else’s hand he can’t swallow his food. It’s the same with moral blemishes; when you see defects such as indifference, pride, and lust in yourself, they don’t bother you; but as soon as you notice them in others, you feel hurt and resentful. 

Jesus is clear in his call for those following him to treat one another just as they would want to be treated. We know it as the “Golden Rule.” Wonderfully, every major religion and faith tradition has the Golden Rule as part of their core values.

The frightening bottom line in the Christian faith is that Jesus says we will be judged exactly like we judge those around us. The measure we give is the measure we will get.

We all have our own moral warts and scabies. Before we start pointing our infected fingers at those around us we need to first clear up the blemishes in our own less-than-perfect lives.