Tag Archives: Typhoon Haiyan

more aid for Ebola victims

The press release copied below tells the story of Stop Hunger Now’s continuing response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa.Typhoon

Stop Hunger Now Sends More Aid to West Africa

Food and other aid shipped to Sierra Leone for Ebola Crisis Response

(Raleigh, NC, Sept. 15, 2014) – Stop Hunger Now is shipping a container of meals and and donated medical aid to New Harvest Ministries & Final Command Ministries in Sierra Leone as part of relief operations in response to the recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa.

The container with 285,120 meals and 50 boxes of medical aid supplied by MAP International departed from the Stop Hunger Now warehouse in Atlanta, GA, on September 4, 2014.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the 2014 Ebola outbreak is one of the largest in history and affects Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. To date, more than 1,848 deaths are attributed to suspected cases of the virus. As a result, there are reported incidences of food shortages, starvation and a general increase in food insecurity in the region.

Stop Hunger Now has committed to provide more than one million meals to Liberia and Sierra Leone over the next few weeks. In August, Stop Hunger Now shipped meals and medical equipment to partners in Liberia and  Sierra Leone.

“Stop Hunger Now is acting quickly to provide life-saving food and aid to the families affected by the Ebola outbreak,” said Rod Brooks, Stop Hunger Now President and CEO. “We have committed an initial response of one million meals, and as the extent of the need becomes more clear, we intend to help as long as necessary.”

In addition to meals, Stop Hunger Now is organizing the shipment of other critical supplies such as first aid kits, medical gloves, face masks, hazmat kits, personal protection equipment.

Founded in 1998, Stop Hunger Now has delivered aid and disaster relief supplies in the form of food, medical supplies, clothing, school supplies, and more to thousands of disaster victims and other hungry and vulnerable people around the world.  More than 450,000 volunteers have packaged the highly nutritious dehydrated meals comprised of rice, soy, vegetables, flavoring, and 23 essential vitamins and minerals during popular community-supported Stop Hunger Now meal packaging events.

“We’re grateful for the many volunteers who have packaged meals with Stop Hunger Now. Their support has made this shipment possible. We encourage others to schedule meal packaging events and commit their donations to help us ship meals so that we can continue to provide much needed relief,” says Brooks.

Stop Hunger Now also has a track record of providing meals in response to disasters. After Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines in November 2013, Stop Hunger Now shipped 3 million meals and more than $672,800 in donated aid for a response totaling more than $1.5 million towards relief efforts. The organization provided nearly 200,000 meals to victims of Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

For more information or to make a donation,  visit www.stophungernow.org.

 

Typhoon Haiyan’s aftermath in northern Cebu

Here are a few photos from the Stop Hunger Now team’s assessment trip to north Cebu. Although not as devastated as Taclibon, the needs of this area are immense and will be for months to come. Food, water and shelter are needed for immediate relief, but long-term aid for rehabilitation and reconstruction is also going to be essential, as well.

Only the church remains in this community

Only the church remains in this community

waterfront areas were hit hrd

waterfront areas were hit hard

palm tree snapped like matchsticks

palm trees snapped like matchsticks

homeless survivors now living in cemetery crypts

homeless survivors now living in cemetery crypts

little gestures mean a lot

Allen Renquist, Jordan Gurnesy and I arrived at our hotel here in Manila early this morning (a little after 1am) after 30+hours of nonstop travel. All of us were pleased to finally have a chance to get a hot shower and stretch out for even a short night’s sleep.

But what was really the most satisfying feeling for all three of us was just how easy it was to get all nine duffel bags of water filters through Philippines Customs. We were concerned, to say the least. We were bringing in 700 waters filters in our checked baggage. For those of you who might not have ever attempted such a feat…well, it’s a big deal. It could have been “nightmare quality” difficult.

First, packaging 700 water filters is no simple task. As I mentioned, nine very full duffel bags. Then transporting nine duffel bags of filters to the airport at 0530 in the morning takes teamwork. Checking in for an international flight always takes a little longer than checking in for domestic flights. Try it with nine over-sized duffel bags.

Even getting nine duffel bags of water filters and personal luggage from the conveyor belt to the customs checkpoint takes a fair bit of coordination–especially after 30 hours of flying.

But what made the process so rewarding is that during every step there was an amazing amount of help. Stop Hunger Now staff went above & beyond their normal excellent work to ensure the filters would make it to the Philippines. Then when Delta Airlines found out the duffel bags contained humanitarian relief supplies they graciously allowed us to check the additional bags at no cost.

When we arrived in the Philippines all three of us were immediately struck by the appreciation shown to us by the Philippines Immigration & Customs officials. Several times we were thanked by the officials for coming to help. It surprised us. I cannot ever remember an immigration official ever thanking me before.

And when we finally took our three carts of water filter-filled duffel bags to Customs the official asked us what was in the bags. We told her.  She didn’t open a single bag. She just stamped our customs forms, and then took the time to thank us for coming to the Philippines to help. What a great start to our time here.

It’s such little gestures that mean a lot, especially at one in the morning.