Tag Archives: vision

real leaders don’t need titles

Real leaders demonstrate their vision, their plans, their commitment and their power, through action. They consistently work to empower those around them through encouragement, coaching and positive reinforcement. Real leaders are definitely not perfect, but they are always committed to making a positive difference in the world and for the world.

Then there are others, like the #BLOTUS, who just seek power to enrich themselves. Their vision extends only as far as their mirrors and their checkbooks. Fake leaders are easily recognized by their whining, their sensitivity to criticism, and their pathological inability to accept responsibility.

No one is obliged to follow a fake leader. No one is required to respect a fake leader.

The good news is that there are real leaders who care and are willing to make a real difference. They are the ones who provide true hope for the future of our world.

We can ignore the fake leaders. Their is hope. All we need to do is to follow the real leaders.

a circus has to have monkeys

Machiavelli lived in the 15th century, but his methodology for determining the intelligence of a ruler is still valid today. Looking at the sycophants and henchmen around the #BLOTUS tells us a lot, not only concerning his intelligence, but his vision for our country.

The most frightening fact is that this incompetent whiner has intentionally surrounded himself with those whose vision for destroying democracy perfectly coincides with his. From Jeff Sessions to Betsy DeVos, his Cabinet is filled with those antagonistic to the very departments they supposedly lead.

The only picks that actually support the work of their department are those of the Department of Defense and other military postings. But then, this makes sense as all dictators want the strongest military they can afford. That’s what keeps them in power.

#BLOTUS cannot compromise. He cannot negotiate. He cannot get legislation passed. Actually, he would be happy to rule by divine decree.

The question I have, and that is rightfully being raised by many others, is where will the fascination and admiration that #BLOTUS has of the world’s worst dictators lead us? His desire to be a brutal strongman is obvious.  Is his vision for the US to transform our democracy into a Trumptatorship?

The very real and very frightening reality here is that this is our circus, and these are all our monkeys.

 

Farewell, Mr. President!

For eight years we have been blessed with a scandal-free First Family. I, for one, will miss President Obama’s quiet dignity and deep strength in the face of all the hatred and opposition he faced from the moment he took the oath of office.

History will bear record to his accomplishments. He has exemplified true servant leadership and has led our nation with intelligence, wit, humor and true humility.

We now enter a new era where the new leader of our nation thrives on lies and scandals, cannot communicate a clear thought and reeks of racism, xenophobia and bigotry. I, along with most of the world, am holding my breath as the United States begins a perilous journey led by an ego larger than the nation, itself.

Farewell, President Obama, and God bless you. You are already missed.

in your hands

This has always been true. Each of us has the glorious opportunity to create the world we want. We can make a difference in the lives of thousands, even millions who live in crushing poverty and never escape the shadow of hunger,

Working together we can change the world forever. We can rewrite history. We can become a part of a global movement that truly ends hunger in our lifetime. This is my goal. And it’s always been the vision that drives Stop Hunger Now. Join with me and let’s create a better and more just world for all.

it’s about passion

~the unintended muse~ — 10000yess: Bukowski knows it:

I have never called it duty, but I love this quote by Bukowski, my favorite contemporary poet. My entire adult life has been consumed with a burning desire to create a world without hunger. That focus has led me to over 100 countries and more areas of conflict and devastation than I can count, and it has introduced me to an entire world of caring and compassionate people who live to make a difference in the lives of those most in need.

Now, as the flames are starting to burn a little less intensely I am gratified to see that the world has finally realized that ending hunger in our lifetime is a significant priority. I am gratified to see that the United Nations has set a measurable goal of ending hunger by 2030.

Whether I see a hunger-free world or not, the ashes of my life will forever hold the warmth of all those who have given themselves to this grand, glorious and world-changing vision. Thank you, one and all, for caring enough to help end hunger in our lifetime.

using hunger to help solve hunger

[This post is reprinted from the Stop Hunger Now blog page]

Going Hungry to Solve Hunger

Guest post written by Kara Cloud, a student at St. Joseph High School in Trumbull, Connecticut, and participant in this year’s 30 Hour Famine at St. Philip Church.

Inmy first year participating in St. Philip’s 30 Hour Famine, I was initially most struck by the diversity of the people who joined together to fight hunger — young and old, poor and wealthy, religious and nonreligious, parents, high school and elementary school students. All people, all participants in the 2015 30 Hour Famine, were there because they wanted to be.

That’s what intrigued me: who would want to give up four meals, do some physical labor, and spend 30 hours not eating with kids of all ages whom they had never met before? I was interested to the point where I had to figure out what it was all about. I entered with curiosity — I had no expectations seeing as I had not partaken in any event like this before. And I had no idea what a life-changing experience I was about to have.

Typically, people are brought together over meals: holiday celebrations, cooking with parents, meeting up with friends for a dinner out. Yet, nothing has ever made me feel such a bond with others as voluntarily giving up our food for thirty hours to raise awareness for world hunger and poverty. How does your hunger help keep those thousands of miles away from being hungry? I’ve grown up asking myself the same question.

When I was in elementary school, the people working in the cafeteria would always scold the students who threw away their uneaten meals saying, “There are children starving in Africa!” However, it was never explained to us what we should do to help them — because clearly stuffing myself wasn’t going to make them less hungry and there was no efficient way to donate the excess food on my lunch tray to those in need.

It took until my sophomore year in high school before someone gave me an alternative that made sense to me: instead of taking what we have for granted, learn to live without and by doing so, learn to appreciate our privilege and do something with it.

We are lucky to be a nation that has to force ourselves to eat less, because we have the excess food at our fingertips. We are lucky to be able to deny our children dessert, because we have that dessert to deny. Why should we, who are only given these opportunities by chance, not feel some sort of responsibility to give others the same chance to eat a wholesome meal?

Going hungry is not the same as being hungry, and all of the participants at 30 Hour Famine were well aware of their privilege as they came together to package 20,000 meals for the hungry in Burkina Faso, one of the poorest countries in the world located in West Africa. We were all thankful that in 30 hours we would be guaranteed a meal, that the hunger we felt would pass. It made the experience more bearable, easing the grumbles in our stomachs.

However, while my feeling of hunger was pacified by knowing I could eat soon, my feeling of guilt at how lucky I am to be in the small portion of the world’s population that is guaranteed a meal at every breakfast, lunch, and dinner break was not as easily forgotten. We all were united with this recognition of our privilege and worked to grant others the same assurance of another meal, an escape from hunger, by taking donations at supermarkets, packing lunches, and making economical and substantial food through Stop Hunger Now and Catholic Relief Services in a system that uses basic ingredients to provide sustenance for a family of six for one meal.

Everything I learned — the hunger facts, the importance of unity, numerous causes to raise money for, greater appreciation for my privilege — is evident in my smile, my composure, my thoughts. I came to the 30 Hour Famine a blank slate ready to be changed — and I did change. I became more aware, more appreciative, and more global-minded. The most important thing for one’s first Famine experience is to come ready to be changed, and then to go inspire change in the world. Use the fuel given by the food are you are lucky enough to eat, and go fuel some change.

To learn more about the 30 Hour Famine and how you can participate, please visit http://stphilipnorwalk.weebly.com/30-hour-famine.html.

This article originally appeared on The Hour.

audacious dreams

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Live large. Dream big. Everything was once impossible.

If our vision doesn’t exceed our current possibilities it’s not large enough. True visionaries always expand the realm of what’s real and what is possible.

Life is too short for small dreams. Our dreams need to frighten us with their breadth and their scope They need to be audacious. Only then will we know the true joy of achievement.